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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To evaluate the main aspects on CT scans of six patients hospitalized in a bone marrow transplant ward, diagnosed with invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA), during an in-hospital outbreak of the disease. Methods: We reviewed 10 chest CT scans of six neutropenic or immunocompromised patients hospitalized in the hematology and bone marrow transplant ward of the Hospital São Paulo, in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, who were diagnosed with IPA between April of 2007 and October of 2007. The diagnosis of IPA was confirmed by anatomopathological findings (in 2 cases), culture (in 3 cases) or appropriate treatment response (in 1 case). Results: We evaluated the CT scans of three male and three female patients, ranging from 22 to 58 years of age. The most common tomographic findings were nodules (5/6 cases) and areas of consolidation (2/6 cases). The nodules were more often multiple (3/5 cases), with irregular contours (4/5 cases) and accompanied by the halo sign (3/5 cases). One case presented multiple, centrally distributed areas of consolidation, and another presented an isolated, peripheral area of consolidation. Areas of ground-glass attenuation and septal thickening were found in three and two patients, respectively. Bilateral pleural effusion occurred in three cases. Conclusions: Consolidation, nodules, septal thickening, pleural effusion and ground-glass opacities were the principal tomographic findings in the six patients hospitalized in the abovementioned ward during the IPA outbreak. The nodules were often (in 67% of the cases) accompanied by the halo sign, a classically described finding in patients with IPA.
    Jornal Brasileiro de Pneumologia 01/2009; 35(9). DOI:10.1590/S1806-37132009000900015 · 1.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To investigate the clinical application of CT and CT-guided percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy (CT-PTNB) in patients with indeterminate pulmonary nodules (IPNs). Methods: We retrospectively studied 113 patients with PNs undergoing CT and CT-PTNB. Variables such as gender, age at diagnosis, smoking status, CT findings, and CT-PTNB techniques were analyzed. Data analysis was performed with the Student's t-test for independent samples the chi-square test, and normal approximation test for comparison of two proportions. Results: Of the 113 patients studied, 68 (60.2%) were male and 78 (69%) were smokers. The diameter of malignant lesions ranged from 2.6 cm to 10.0 cm. Most of the IPNs (85%) were located in the peripheral region. The biopsied IPNs were found to be malignant in 88 patients (77.8%) and benign in 25 (22.2%). Adenocarcinoma was the most common malignant tumor, affecting older patients. The IPN diameter was significantly greater in patients with malignant PNs than in those with benign IPNs (p < 0.001). Having regular contour correlated significantly with an IPN being benign (p = 0.022), whereas spiculated IPNs and bosselated IPNs were more often malignant (in 50.7% and 28.7%, respectively). Homogeneous attenuation and necrosis were more common in patients with malignant lesions (51.9% and 26.9%, respectively) Conclusions: In our sample, CT and CT-PTNB were useful in distinguishing between malignant and benign IPNs. Advanced age and smoking were significantly associated with malignancy. Certain CT findings related to IPNs (larger diameter, spiculated borders, homogeneous attenuation, and necrosis) were associated with malignancy.
    Jornal brasileiro de pneumologia: publicacao oficial da Sociedade Brasileira de Pneumologia e Tisilogia 07/2014; 40(4):380-388. DOI:10.1590/S1806-37132014000400005
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