Article

Associations of Stressful Life Events and Social Strain With Incident Cardiovascular Disease in the Women's Health Initiative.

Journal of the American Heart Association 04/2014; 3(3). DOI: 10.1161/JAHA.113.000687
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Epidemiologic studies have yielded mixed findings on the association of psychosocial stressors with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. In this study, we examined associations of stressful life events (SLE) and social strain with incident coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke (overall, and for hemorrhagic and ischemic strokes) independent of sociodemographic characteristics, and we evaluated whether these relationships were explained by traditional behavioral and biological risk factors.

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Mar 4, 2015