Article

Highly Transcribed RNA Polymerase II Genes Are Impediments to Replication Fork Progression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA.
Molecular cell (Impact Factor: 14.46). 07/2009; 34(6):722-34. DOI: 10.1016/j.molcel.2009.05.022
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Replication forks face multiple obstacles that slow their progression. By two-dimensional gel analysis, yeast forks pause at stable DNA protein complexes, and this pausing is greatly increased in the absence of the Rrm3 helicase. We used a genome-wide approach to identify 96 sites of very high DNA polymerase binding in wild-type cells. Most of these binding sites were not previously identified pause sites. Rather, the most highly represented genomic category among high DNA polymerase binding sites was the open reading frames (ORFs) of highly transcribed RNA polymerase II genes. Twice as many pause sites were identified in rrm3 compared with wild-type cells, as pausing in this strain occurred at both highly transcribed RNA polymerase II genes and the previously identified protein DNA complexes. ORFs of highly transcribed RNA polymerase II genes are a class of natural pause sites that are not exacerbated in rrm3 cells.

Download full-text

Full-text

Available from: Jason D Lieb, Jul 02, 2015
1 Follower
 · 
110 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: DNA replication and transcription are vital cellular processes during which the genetic information is copied into complementary DNA and RNA molecules. Highly complex machineries required for DNA and RNA synthesis compete for the same DNA template, therefore being on a collision course. Unscheduled replication-transcription clashes alter the gene transcription program and generate replication stress, reducing fork speed. Molecular pathways and mechanisms that minimize the conflict between replication and transcription have been extensively characterized in prokaryotic cells and recently identified also in eukaryotes. A pathological outcome of replication-transcription collisions is the formation of stable RNA:DNA hybrids in molecular structures called R-loops. Growing evidence suggests that R-loop accumulation promotes both genetic and epigenetic instability, thus severely affecting genome functionality. In the present review, we summarize the current knowledge related to replication and transcription conflicts in eukaryotes, their consequences on genome instability and the pathways involved in their resolution. These findings are relevant to clarify the molecular basis of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.
    Frontiers in Genetics 04/2015; 6. DOI:10.3389/fgene.2015.00166
  • Source
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Nuclear RNAi is an important regulator of transcription and epigenetic modification, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Using a genome-wide approach in the fission yeast S. pombe, we have found that Dcr1, but not other components of the canonical RNAi pathway, promotes the release of Pol II from the 3? end of highly transcribed genes, and, surprisingly, from antisense transcription of rRNA and tRNA genes, which are normally transcribed by Pol I and Pol III. These Dcr1-terminated loci correspond to sites of replication stress and DNA damage, likely resulting from transcription-replication collisions. At the rDNA loci, release of Pol II facilitates DNA replication and prevents homologous recombination, which would otherwise lead to loss of rDNA repeats especially during meiosis. Our results reveal a novel role for Dcr1-mediated transcription termination in genome maintenance and may account for widespread regulation of genome stability by nuclear RNAi in higher eukaryotes.
    Cell 10/2014; 159(3):572-83. DOI:10.1016/j.cell.2014.09.031 · 33.12 Impact Factor