Effect of glucosamine or chondroitin sulfate on the osteoarthritis progression: A meta-analysis

Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, 126-1 ga, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-705, Korea.
Rheumatology International (Impact Factor: 1.52). 06/2009; 30(3):357-63. DOI: 10.1007/s00296-009-0969-5
Source: PubMed


The aim of this study was to assess the structural efficacies of daily glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). The authors surveyed randomized controlled studies that examined the effects of long-term daily glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate on joint space narrowing (JSN) in knee OA patients using the Medline and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, and by performing manual searches. Meta-analysis was performed using a fixed effect model because no between-study heterogeneity was evident. Six studies involving 1,502 cases were included in this meta-analysis, which consisted of two studies on glucosamine sulfate and four studies on chondroitin sulfate. Glucosamine sulfate did not show a significant effect versus controls on minimum JSN over the first year of treatment (SMD 0.078, 95% CI -0.116 to -0.273, P = 0.429). However, after 3 years of treatment, glucosamine sulfate revealed a small to moderate protective effect on minimum JSN (SMD 0.432, 95% CI 0.235-0.628, P < 0.001). The same was observed for chondroitin sulfate, which had a small but significant protective effect on minimum JSN after 2 years (SMD 0.261, 95% CI 0.131-0.392, P < 0.001). This meta-analysis of available data shows that glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate may delay radiological progression of OA of the knee after daily administration for over 2 or 3 years.

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    • "Commonly used medications include acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and the supplements glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate. These last cartilage components may delay radiological progression and pain relief of OA after daily administration for 2–3 years (Lee et al., 2010; Vangsness et al., 2009). Glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate have an anti-inflammatory activity and they are able to stimulate proteoglycan synthesis. "
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract The prevalence and incidence of trauma-related injuries, coronary heart disease and other chronic diseases increase dramatically with age. This population sector is therefore a regular consumer of different types of drugs that may affect platelet aggregation and the coagulation cascade. We have evaluated whether the consumption of acetylsalicylic acid, acenocoumarol, glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate, and therefore their presence in blood, could interfere with the preparation and biological outcomes of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF). Clotting time, clot retraction and platelet activation of PRGF was evaluated. PRGF growth factor content and the release of different biomolecules by tendon fibroblasts were also quantified, as well as cell proliferation and cell migration. The preparation and biological potential of PRGF is not affected by the intake of the evaluated drugs, and solely its angiogenic potential and its capacity to induce HA and fibronectin synthesis, is reduced in patients taking anti-coagulants.
    Growth factors (Chur, Switzerland) 11/2014; 33(1):1-8. DOI:10.3109/08977194.2014.977437 · 3.39 Impact Factor
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    • "p < 0.001). This meta-analysis of available data shows that glucosamine sulfate may delay radiological progression of OA of the knee after daily administration for over 2 or 3 years [51]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Over the last 20 years, several studies have investigated the ability of glucosamine sulfate to improve the symptoms (pain and function) and to delay the structural progression of osteoarthritis. There is now a large, convergent body of evidence that glucosamine sulfate, given at a daily oral dose of 1,500 mg, is able to significantly reduce the symptoms of osteoarthritis in the lower limbs. This dose of glucosamine sulfate has also been shown, in two independent studies, to prevent the joint space narrowing observed at the femorotibial compartment in patients with mild-to-moderate knee osteoarthritis. This effect also translated into a 50 % reduction in the incidence of osteoarthritis-related surgery of the lower limbs during a 5-year period following the withdrawal of the treatment. Some discrepancies have been described between the results of studies performed with a patent-protected formulation of glucosamine sulfate distributed as a drug and those having used glucosamine preparations purchased from global suppliers, packaged, and sold over-the-counter as nutritional supplements.
    Rheumatology International 03/2012; 32(10):2959-67. DOI:10.1007/s00296-012-2416-2 · 1.52 Impact Factor
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    • "They concluded that glucosamine produced no clinically relevant effect on pain or structure. Another recent meta-analysis concentrated on the structure-modifying effect of glucosamine [65]. The authors searched databases through 2008. "
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    ABSTRACT: Glucosamine in its acetylated form is a natural constituent of some glycosaminoglycans (for example, hyaluronic acid and keratan sulfate) in the proteoglycans found in articular cartilage, intervertebral disc and synovial fluid. Glucosamine can be extracted and stabilized by chemical modification and used as a drug or a nutraceutical. It has been approved for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) in Europe to promote cartilage and joint health and is sold over the counter as a dietary supplement in the United States. Various formulations of glucosamine have been tested, including glucosamine sulfate and glucosamine hydrochloride. In vitro and in vivo studies have uncovered glucosamine's mechanisms of action on articular tissues (cartilage, synovial membrane and subchondral bone) and justified its efficacy by demonstrating structure-modifying and anti-inflammatory effects at high concentrations. However, results from clinical trials have raised many concerns. Pharmacokinetic studies have shown that glucosamine is easily absorbed, but the current treatment doses (for example, 1,500 mg/day) barely reach the required therapeutic concentration in plasma and tissue. The symptomatic effect size of glucosamine varies greatly depending on the formulation used and the quality of clinical trials. Importantly, the effect size reduces when evidence is accumulated chronologically and evidence for the structure-modifying effects of glucosamine are sparse. Hence, glucosamine was at first recommended by EULAR and OARSI for the management of knee pain and structure improvement in OA patients, but not in the most recent NICE guidelines. Consequently, the published recommendations for the management of OA require revision. Glucosamine is generally safe and although there are concerns about potential allergic and salt-related side effects of some formulations, no major adverse events have been reported so far. This paper examines all the in vitro and in vivo evidence for the mechanism of action of glucosamine as well as reviews the results of clinical trials. The pharmacokinetics, side effects and differences observed with different formulations of glucosamine and combination therapies are also considered. Finally, the importance of study design and criteria of evaluation are highlighted as new compounds represent new interesting options for the management of OA.
    Arthritis research & therapy 01/2012; 14(1):201. DOI:10.1186/ar3657 · 3.75 Impact Factor
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