Article

Developmental regression in children with an autism spectrum disorder identified by a population-based surveillance system.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, USA.
Autism (Impact Factor: 2.27). 08/2009; 13(4):357-74. DOI: 10.1177/1362361309105662
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT This study evaluated the phenomenon of autistic regression using population-based data. The sample comprised 285 children who met the autism spectrum disorder (ASD) case definition within an ongoing surveillance program. Results indicated that children with a previously documented ASD diagnosis had higher rates of autistic regression than children who met the ASD surveillance definition but did not have a clearly documented ASD diagnosis in their records (17-26 percent of surveillance cases). Most children regressed around 24 months of age and boys were more likely to have documented regression than girls. Half of the children with regression had developmental concerns noted prior to the loss of skills. Moreover, children with autistic regression were more likely to show certain associated features, including cognitive impairment.These data indicate that some children with ASD experience a loss of skills in the first few years of life and may have a unique symptom profile.

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