Article

Mutant LRRK2(R1441G) BAC transgenic mice recapitulate cardinal features of Parkinson's disease.

Department of Neurology and Neurosciences, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York, USA.
Nature Neuroscience (Impact Factor: 14.98). 08/2009; 12(7):826-8. DOI: 10.1038/nn.2349
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are the most common genetic cause of Parkinson's disease. We created a LRRK2 transgenic mouse model that recapitulates cardinal features of the disease: an age-dependent and levodopa-responsive slowness of movement associated with diminished dopamine release and axonal pathology of nigrostriatal dopaminergic projection. These mice provide a valid model of Parkinson's disease and are a resource for the investigation of pathogenesis and therapeutics.

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Available from: M. Flint Beal, Jun 03, 2015
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