Article

SNCA variants are associated with increased risk for multiple system atrophy

Laboratory of Neurogenetics, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, 35 Convent Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
Annals of Neurology (Impact Factor: 11.91). 05/2009; 65(5):610-4. DOI: 10.1002/ana.21685
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To test whether the synucleinopathies Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy (MSA) share a common genetic etiology, we performed a candidate single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) association study of the 384 most associated SNPs in a genome-wide association study of Parkinson's disease in 413 MSA cases and 3,974 control subjects. The 10 most significant SNPs were then replicated in additional 108 MSA cases and 537 controls. SNPs at the SNCA locus were significantly associated with risk for increased risk for the development of MSA (combined p = 5.5 x 10(-12); odds ratio 6.2) [corrected].

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