A Comprehensive Nationwide Study of the Incidence Rate and Lifetime Risk for Treated Mental Disorders

JAMA Psychiatry (Impact Factor: 12.01). 05/2014; 71(5):573-81. DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.16
Source: PubMed


IMPORTANCE Understanding the epidemiologic profile of the life course of mental disorders is fundamental for research and planning for health care. Although previous studies have used population surveys, informative and complementary estimates can be derived from population-based registers. OBJECTIVE To derive comprehensive and precise estimates of the incidence rate of and lifetime risk for any mental disorder and a range of specific mental disorders. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We conducted a follow-up study of all Danish residents (5.6 million persons), to whom all treatment is provided by the government health care system without charge to the patient, from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2012 (total follow-up, 59.5 million person-years). During the study period, 320 543 persons received first lifetime treatment in a psychiatric setting for any mental disorder; 489 006 persons were censored owing to death; and 69 987 persons were censored owing to emigration. Specific categories of mental disorders investigated included organic mental disorders, substance abuse disorders, schizophrenia, mood disorders, anxiety, eating disorders, personality disorders, mental retardation, pervasive developmental disorders, and behavioral and emotional disorders. EXPOSURES Age and sex. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Sex- and age-specific incidence rates and cumulative incidences and sex-specific lifetime risks. RESULTS During the course of life, 37.66% of females (95% CI, 37.52%-37.80%) and 32.05% of males (31.91%-32.19%) received their first treatment in a psychiatric setting for any mental disorder. The occurrence of mental disorders varied markedly between diagnostic categories and by sex and age. The sex- and age-specific incidence rates for many mental disorders had a single peak incidence rate during the second and third decades of life. Some disorders had a second peak in the sex- and age-specific incidence rate later in life. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE This nationwide study provides a first comprehensive assessment of the lifetime risks for treated mental disorders. Approximately one-third of the Danish population received treatment for mental disorders. The distinct signatures of the different mental disorders with respect to sex and age have important implications for service planning and etiologic research.

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    • "" The latter also recommends a greater focus on suicide among individuals with mental illness, especially in the early phases of the disorders (World Health Organization, 2014). People with mental disorders are a large risk group (Pedersen et al., 2014) for suicide, and they have the highest relative risk for suicide . Translated into population attributable risk, it has been estimated that if suicide mortality among individuals with mental disorders were reduced to the level found in the general population, the overall suicide risk could be reduced by almost 50% (Mortensen et al., 2000). "
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    ABSTRACT: Suicide is a serious public health problem, with more than 800,000 deaths taking place worldwide each year. Mental disorders are associated with increased risk of suicide. In schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, the lifetime risk of suicide death is estimated to be 5.6%. The risk is particularly high during the first year of the initial contact with mental health services, being almost twice as high as in the later course of the illness. The most consistently reported risk factor for suicide among people with psychotic disorders is a history of attempted suicide and depression. Suicide risk in psychosis in Denmark decreased over time, most likely because of improved quality of inpatient and outpatient services. There is a high proportion of young people with first-episode psychosis who attempted suicide before their first contact with mental health services. This finding suggests that the mortality rates associated with psychotic disorders may be underreported because of suicide deaths taking place before first treatment contact. However, currently, no data exist to confirm or refute this hypothesis. Attempted suicide can be an early warning sign of later psychotic disorder. Data from different studies indicate that the risk of suicide attempt during the first year of treatment is as high as 10%. The most important risk factors for attempted suicide after the first contact are young age, female sex, suicidal plans, and a history of suicide attempt. Early intervention services are helpful in first-episode psychosis, and staff members should, in collaboration with the patients, monitor the risk of suicide and develop and revise crisis plans.
    The Journal of nervous and mental disease 05/2015; 203(5):387-392. DOI:10.1097/NMD.0000000000000296 · 1.69 Impact Factor
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    • "The pattern of sex differences was generally consistent with prior literature (Kessler et al. 2005, Seedat et al. 2009); females had higher rates of mood, anxiety, phobic and eating disorders , while males had higher rates of substance use disorders. Many of these differences were also mirrored in a recent national study of the cumulative incidence of treated disorders at age 50 in Denmark (Pedersen et al. 2014). "
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    ABSTRACT: There are only a small number of prospective studies that have systematically evaluated standardised diagnostic criteria for mental disorder for more than a decade. The aim of this study is to present the approximated overall and sex-specific cumulative incidence of mental disorder in the Zurich cohort study, a prospective cohort study of 18-19 years olds from the canton of Zurich, Switzerland, who were followed through age 50. A stratified sample of 591 participants were interviewed with the Structured Psychopathological Interview and Rating of the Social Consequences of Psychological Disturbances for Epidemiology, a semi-structured interview that uses a bottom-up approach to assess the past-year presence of 15 psychiatric syndromes. Seven interview waves took place between 1979 and 2008. Approximated cumulative incidence was estimated using Kaplan-Meier methods. Rates of mental disorder were considerably higher than those generally reported in cross-sectional surveys. We found rates ranging from 32.5% for major depressive disorder to 1.2% for Bipolar I disorder. The cumulative probability of experiencing any of the mental disorders assessed by age 50 was 73.9%, the highest reported to date. We also found that rates differed by sex for most disorders, with females generally reporting higher rates of mood, anxiety and phobic disorder, and males reporting higher rates of substance- and alcohol-related disorders. These findings confirm those of other long-term prospective studies that indicate the nearly universal nature of disturbances of emotion and behaviour across the life span. Greater community awareness of the normative nature of these experiences is warranted. An important area of future research is study long-term course and stability to determine who among those with such disturbances suffer from chronic disabling mental disorders. Such longitudinal studies may aid in directing services and intervention efforts where they are most needed.
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