Article

The Role of Scalp Acupuncture for Relieving the Chronic Pain of Degenerative Osteoarthritis: A Pilot Study of Egyptian Women.

Medical Acupuncture 06/2013; 25(3):216-220. DOI: 10.1089/acu.2012.0892
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common chronic and painful condition secondary to deterioration of cartilage. OA-related pain can be managed pharmacologically together with complementary therapies, such as acupuncture.
The aim of this trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of Yamamoto New Scalp Acupuncture (YNSA) for relieving pain associated with OA in Egyptian women.
At the Female Outpatient Pain Clinic, of the National Research Centre, in Cairo, Egypt, between March 2008 and June 2009, 30 females (ages 27-80) presenting with chronic pain caused by OA were studied.
The affected YNSA points were treated for 20 minutes in a single session.
Pain was assessed by a visual analogue scale (VAS) prior to, and 1 hour after, the intervention.
PREINTERVENTION VAS SCORES WERE: 3-10 (mean 7.43±1.9; P>0.05). Postintervention VAS scores ranged from 0 to 8 (mean 3.37±2.1) with a statistically significant positive correlation between these scores and pretreatment values (P=0.01). Postintervention VAS scores were significantly related to pain locations. Post-hoc analysis showed statistically significant lower postintervention VAS scores for cervical OA, compared to those of lumbosacral OA.
YNSA acupuncture is effective in immediate pain relief among females suffering from degenerative OA.

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