T Cell Receptor Signaling Can Directly Enhance the Avidity of CD28 Ligand Binding

University of Iowa, United States of America
PLoS ONE (Impact Factor: 3.23). 02/2014; 9(2):e89263. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0089263
Source: PubMed


T cell activation takes place in the context of a spatial and kinetic reorganization of cell surface proteins and signaling molecules at the contact site with an antigen presenting cell, termed the immunological synapse. Coordination of the activation, recruitment, and signaling from T cell receptor (TCR) in conjunction with adhesion and costimulatory receptors regulates both the initiation and duration of signaling that is required for T cell activation. The costimulatory receptor, CD28, is an essential signaling molecule that determines the quality and quantity of T cell immune responses. Although the functional consequences of CD28 engagement are well described, the molecular mechanisms that regulate CD28 function are largely unknown. Using a micropipet adhesion frequency assay, we show that TCR signaling enhances the direct binding between CD28 and its ligand, CD80. Although CD28 is expressed as a homodimer, soluble recombinant CD28 can only bind ligand monovalently. Our data suggest that the increase in CD28-CD28 binding is mediated through a change in CD28 valency. Molecular dynamic simulations and in vitro mutagenesis indicate that mutations at the base of the CD28 homodimer interface, distal to the ligand-binding site, can induce a change in the orientation of the dimer that allows for bivalent ligand binding. When expressed in T cells, this mutation allows for high avidity CD28-CD80 interactions without TCR signaling. Molecular dynamic simulations also suggest that wild type CD28 can stably adopt a bivalent conformation. These results support a model whereby inside-out signaling from the TCR can enhance CD28 ligand interactions by inducing a change in the CD28 dimer interface to allow for bivalent ligand binding and ultimately the transduction of CD28 costimulatory signals that are required for T cell activation.

17 Reads
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is able to control HIV-1 viral replication, however long-lived latent infection in resting memory CD4(+) T-cells persist. The mechanisms for establishment and maintenance of latent infection in resting memory CD4(+) T-cells remain unclear. Previously we have shown that HIV-1 infection of resting CD4(+) T-cells co-cultured with CD11c(+) myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) produced a population of non-proliferating T-cells with latent infection. Here we asked whether different antigen presenting cells (APC), including subpopulations of DC and monocytes, were able to induce post-integration latent infection in resting CD4(+) T-cells, and examined potential cell interactions that may be involved using RNA-seq. Results: mDC (CD1c(+)), SLAN(+) DC and CD14(+) monocytes were most efficient in stimulating proliferation of CD4(+) T-cells during syngeneic culture and in generating post-integration latent infection in non-proliferating CD4(+) T-cells following HIV-1 infection of APC-T cell co-cultures. In comparison, plasmacytoid DC (pDC) and B-cells did not induce latent infection in APC-T-cell co-cultures. We compared the RNA expression profiles of APC subpopulations that could and could not induce latency in non-proliferating CD4(+) T-cells. Gene expression analysis, comparing the CD1c(+) mDC, SLAN(+) DC and CD14(+) monocyte subpopulations to pDC identified 53 upregulated genes that encode proteins expressed on the plasma membrane that could signal to CD4(+) T-cells via cell-cell interactions (32 genes), immune checkpoints (IC) (5 genes), T-cell activation (9 genes), regulation of apoptosis (5 genes), antigen presentation (1 gene) and through unknown ligands (1 gene). Conclusions: APC subpopulations from the myeloid lineage, specifically mDC subpopulations and CD14(+) monocytes, were able to efficiently induce post-integration HIV-1 latency in non-proliferating CD4(+) T-cells in vitro. Inhibition of key pathways involved in mDC-T-cell interactions and HIV-1 latency may provide novel targets to eliminate HIV-1 latency.
    Retrovirology 09/2015; 12(1):76. DOI:10.1186/s12977-015-0204-2 · 4.19 Impact Factor

Full-text (3 Sources)

17 Reads
Available from
Jan 13, 2015