Article

Nanotherapeutics—Product Development Along the “Nanomaterial” Discussion

Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Impact Factor: 3.01). 03/2014; 103(3). DOI: 10.1002/jps.23879
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Nanomaterials have become part of formulation development in the pharmaceutical industry and offer exciting opportunities in the area of targeted drug delivery. But they may also exert unexpected toxicities and potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Since the Scientific Committee on Emerging and Newly Identified Health Risks recommended a definition of “nanomaterials” for implementation into the existing and upcoming regulatory framework in the European Union, a discussion about safety requirements of new nanoscale products has emerged. At the same time, the Food and Drug Administration of the United States still observes recent developments in this area. Although the impact on the pharmaceutical product chain is still uncertain, guidelines on risk assessment in food products and cosmetics are available and offer a preview of future developments in the regimens of pharmaceuticals. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci

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Available from: Matthias Wacker, Feb 07, 2014
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