Article

Evaluation of active living every day in adults with arthritis.

Thurston Arthritis Research Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Journal of Physical Activity and Health (Impact Factor: 1.95). 02/2014; 11(2):285-95. DOI: 10.1123/jpah.2011-0317
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Background: Adults with arthritis can benefit from participation in physical activity and may be assisted by organized programs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 20-week behavioral lifestyle intervention, Active Living Every Day (ALED), for improvements in primary outcomes (physical activity levels, aerobic endurance, function, symptoms). Methods: A 20-week randomized controlled community trial was conducted in 354 adults. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and 20 weeks in the intervention and wait-list control groups. The intervention group was also assessed at 6 and 12 months. Mean outcomes were determined by multilevel regression models in the intervention and control groups at follow-up points. Results: At 20 weeks, the intervention group significantly increased participation in physical activity, and improved aerobic endurance, and select measures of function while pain, fatigue and stiffness remained status quo. In the intervention group, significant improvements in physical activity at 20 weeks were maintained at 6 and 12 months, and stiffness decreased. Conclusions: ALED appears to improve participation in physical activity, aerobic endurance, and function without exacerbating disease symptoms in adults with arthritis.

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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Physical and psychological symptoms limit physical activity for people with arthritis. We examined if self-efficacy mediated a relationship between symptom and physical activity (PA) frequency change. METHODS: This was a secondary analysis of older adults with arthritis and joint pain in a trial of a lifestyle PA program (n=339). Measures were depressive symptoms, pain, fatigue, arthritis self-efficacy, PA self-efficacy, and PA frequency. We used a panel model to analyze relationships at baseline and changes at 20-weeks. RESULTS: The mean age was 68.8 years. At baseline, depression and fatigue were associated with arthritis self-efficacy (β = -.34 and -.24) and, in turn, PA self-efficacy (β = .63); PA self-efficacy was associated with PA (β = .15). Pain and depression changes were associated with arthritis self-efficacy change (β = -.20 and -.21) and, in turn, PA self-efficacy (β = .32) change; PA self-efficacy change was associated with PA change (β = .36). CONCLUSION: Change in symptom severity affected change in PA frequency. These relationships appeared to operate through self-efficacy. Over time, pain appeared to have a stronger relationship than fatigue with self-efficacy and PA. These findings support strategies to help people with arthritis strengthen their confidence for symptom coping and PA participation.
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