Article

IDO2 is critical for IDO1-mediated T cell regulation and exerts a non-redundant function in inflammation.

International Immunology (Impact Factor: 3.18). 01/2014; DOI: 10.1093/intimm/dxt073
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT IDO2 is implicated in tryptophan catabolism and immunity but its physiological functions are not well established. Here we report the characterization of mice genetically deficient in IDO2, which develop normally but exhibit defects in IDO-mediated T cell regulation and inflammatory responses. Construction of this strain was prompted in part by our discovery that IDO2 function is attenuated in macrophages from Ido1-/- mice due to altered message splicing, generating a functional mosaic with implications for interpreting findings in Ido1-/- mice. No apparent defects were observed in Ido2-/- mice in embryonic development or hematopoietic differentiation, with wild-type profiles documented for kynurenine in blood serum and for immune cells in spleen, lymph nodes, peritoneum, thymus and bone marrow of naïve mice. In contrast, upon immune stimulation we determined that IDO1-dependent T regulatory cell generation was defective in Ido2-/- mice, supporting Ido1-Ido2 genetic interaction and establishing a functional role for Ido2 in immune modulation. Pathophysiologically, both Ido1-/- and Ido2-/- mice displayed reduced skin contact hypersensitivity responses, but mechanistic distinctions were apparent, with only Ido2 deficiency associated with a suppression of immune regulatory cytokines that included GM-CSF, G-CSF, IFN-γ, TNFα, IL-6 and MCP-1/CCL2. Different contributions to inflammation were likewise indicated by the finding that Ido2-/- mice did not phenocopy Ido1-/- mice in the reduced susceptibility of the latter to inflammatory skin cancer. Taken together, our results offer an initial glimpse into immune modulation by IDO2, revealing its genetic interaction with IDO1 and distinguishing its non-redundant contributions to inflammation.

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    ABSTRACT: Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenases (IDOs) are tryptophan-catabolizing enzymes with immunomodulatory functions. However, the biological role of IDO2 and its relationship with IDO1 are unknown. To assess the relationship between IDO2 and IDO1, we investigated the effects of co-expression of human (h) IDO2 on hIDO1 activity. Cells co-expressing hIDO1 and hIDO2 showed reduced tryptophan metabolic activity compared with those expressing hIDO1 only. In a proteomic analysis, hIDO1-expressing cells exhibited enhanced expression of proteins related to the cell cycle and amino acid metabolism, and decreased expression of proteins related to cell survival. However, cells co-expressing hIDO1 and hIDO2 showed enhanced expression of negative regulators of cell apoptosis compared with those expressing hIDO1 only. Co-expression of hIDO1 and hIDO2 rescued the cell death induced by tryptophan-depletion through hIDO1 activity. Cells expressing only hIDO2 exhibited no marked differences in proteome profiles or cell growth compared with mock-transfectants. Cellular tryptophan metabolic activity and cell death were restored by co-expressing the hIDO2 mutant substituting the histidine 360 residue for alanine. These results demonstrate that hIDO2 plays a novel role as a negative regulator of hIDO1 by competing for heme-binding with hIDO1, and provide information useful for development of therapeutic strategies to control cancer and immunological disorders that target IDO molecules.
    Experimental and Molecular Medicine 11/2014; 46:e121. · 2.46 Impact Factor
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    Frontiers in Immunology 11/2014; 5:585.
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    ABSTRACT: Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) are tryptophan-degrading enzymes that have independently evolved to catalyze the first step in tryptophan catabolism via the kynurenine pathway (KP). The depletion of tryptophan and formation of KP metabolites modulates the activity of the mammalian immune, reproductive, and central nervous systems. IDO and TDO enzymes can have overlapping or distinct functions depending on their expression patterns. The expression of TDO and IDO enzymes in mammals differs not only by tissue/cellular localization but also by their induction by distinct stimuli. To add to the complexity, these genes also have undergone duplications in some organisms leading to multiple isoforms of IDO or TDO. For example, many vertebrates, including all mammals, have acquired two IDO genes via gene duplication, although the IDO1-like gene has been lost in some lower vertebrate lineages. Gene duplications can allow the homologs to diverge and acquire different properties to the original gene. There is evidence for IDO enzymes having differing enzymatic characteristics, signaling properties, and biological functions. This review analyzes the evolutionary convergence of IDO and TDO enzymes as tryptophan-catabolizing enzymes and the divergent evolution of IDO homologs to generate an enzyme family with diverse characteristics not possessed by TDO enzymes, with an emphasis on the immune system.
    Frontiers in Immunology 10/2014; 5:485.

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Jun 6, 2014