Article

A Novel Community-Based Buprenorphine Program: Client Description and Initial Outcomes.

Journal of Addiction Medicine (Impact Factor: 1.71). 01/2014; DOI: 10.1097/ADM.0000000000000004
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT : The aims of this retrospective, descriptive study were to describe clients served by a buprenorphine program in a community-based recovery center and to present initial treatment outcomes. A record review was conducted for clients treated from July 2010 to August 2011. Client demographic, health, substance use, and treatment history data were abstracted from the records of the first 78 clients served. Buprenorphine and opiate use data were collected via urine toxicology reports, collected weekly among clients who remained enrolled in treatment. The average percentages of weeks spent opiate free and buprenorphine compliant were 83% (SD = 26%) and 95% (SD = 13%), respectively. When positive heroin toxicology and negative buprenorphine toxicology were replaced for the missing/unknown data, the average percentages of opiate-abstinent weeks and buprenorphine compliance were 60% (SD = 34%) and 74% (SD = 28%), respectively. Roughly half of all clients (49%) were successfully transitioned to continue treatment with buprenorphine in a primary care setting. Findings from this study demonstrate that buprenorphine treatment for opiate dependence can be incorporated into a community-based recovery center with high rates of opiate abstinence and treatment adherence.

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