Article

TRAF2 is an NF-κB-activating oncogene in epithelial cancers

Oncogene (Impact Factor: 8.56). 12/2013; 34(2). DOI: 10.1038/onc.2013.543
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Aberrant nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation is frequently observed in human cancers. Genome characterization efforts have identified genetic alterations in multiple components of the NF-κB pathway, some of which have been shown to be essential for cancer initiation and tumor maintenance. Here, using patient tumors and cancer cell lines, we identify the NF-κB regulator, TRAF2 (tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 2), as an oncogene that is recurrently amplified and rearranged in 15% of human epithelial cancers. Suppression of TRAF2 in cancer cells harboring TRAF2 copy number gain inhibits proliferation, NF-κB activation, anchorage-independent growth and tumorigenesis. Cancer cells that are dependent on TRAF2 also require NF-κB for survival. The phosphorylation of TRAF2 at serine 11 is essential for the survival of cancer cells harboring TRAF2 amplification. Together, these observations identify TRAF2 as a frequently amplified oncogene.Oncogene advance online publication, 23 December 2013; doi:10.1038/onc.2013.543.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
85 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The activation of NF-kappaB by receptors in the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor and Toll/interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor families requires the TRAF family of adaptor proteins. Receptor oligomerization causes the recruitment of TRAFs to the receptor complex, followed by the activation of a kinase cascade that results in the phosphorylation of IkappaB. TANK is a TRAF-binding protein that can inhibit the binding of TRAFs to receptor tails and can also inhibit NF-kappaB activation by these receptors. However, TANK also displays the ability to stimulate TRAF-mediated NF-kappaB activation. In this report, we investigate the mechanism of the stimulatory activity of TANK. We find that TANK interacts with TBK1 (TANK-binding kinase 1), a novel IKK-related kinase that can activate NF-kappaB in a kinase-dependent manner. TBK1, TANK and TRAF2 can form a ternary complex, and complex formation appears to be required for TBK1 activity. Kinase-inactive TBK1 inhibits TANK-mediated NF-kappaB activation but does not block the activation mediated by TNF-alpha, IL-1 or CD40. The TBK1-TANK-TRAF2 signaling complex functions upstream of NIK and the IKK complex and represents an alternative to the receptor signaling complex for TRAF-mediated activation of NF-kappaB.
    The EMBO Journal 01/2000; 18(23):6694-704. DOI:10.1093/emboj/18.23.6694 · 10.75 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Protein modification by the conjugation of ubiquitin moieties--ubiquitination--plays a major part in many biological processes, including cell cycle and apoptosis. The enzymes that mediate ubiquitin-conjugation have been well-studied, but much less is known about the ubiquitin-specific proteases that mediate de-ubiquitination of cellular substrates. To study this gene family, we designed a collection of RNA interference vectors to suppress 50 human de-ubiquitinating enzymes, and used these vectors to identify de-ubiquitinating enzymes in cancer-relevant pathways. We report here that inhibition of one of these enzymes, the familial cylindromatosis tumour suppressor gene (CYLD), having no known function, enhances activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB. We show that CYLD binds to the NEMO (also known as IKKgamma) component of the IkappaB kinase (IKK) complex, and appears to regulate its activity through de-ubiquitination of TRAF2, as TRAF2 ubiquitination can be modulated by CYLD. Inhibition of CYLD increases resistance to apoptosis, suggesting a mechanism through which loss of CYLD contributes to oncogenesis. We show that this effect can be relieved by aspirin derivatives that inhibit NF-kappaB activity, which suggests a therapeutic intervention strategy to restore growth control in patients suffering from familial cylindromatosis.
    Nature 09/2003; 424(6950):797-801. DOI:10.1038/nature01811 · 42.35 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We employed gene targeting to study H2AX, a histone variant phosphorylated in chromatin surrounding DNA double-strand breaks. Mice deficient for both H2AX and p53 (H(delta/delta)P(-/-)) rapidly developed immature T and B lymphomas and solid tumors. Moreover, H2AX haploinsufficiency caused genomic instability in normal cells and, on a p53-deficient background, early onset of various tumors including more mature B lymphomas. Most H2AX(delta/delta)p53(-/-) or H2AX(+/delta)p53(-/-) B lineage lymphomas harbored chromosome 12 (IgH)/15 (c-myc) translocations with hallmarks of either aberrant V(D)J or class switch recombination. In contrast, H2AX(delta/delta)p53(-/-) thymic lymphomas had clonal translocations that did not involve antigen receptor loci and which likely occurred during cellular expansion. Thus, H2AX helps prevent aberrant repair of both programmed and general DNA breakage and, thereby, functions as a dosage-dependent suppressor of genomic instability and tumors in mice. Notably, H2AX maps to a cytogenetic region frequently altered in human cancers, possibly implicating similar functions in man.
    Cell 09/2003; 114(3):359-70. DOI:10.1016/S0092-8674(03)00566-X · 33.12 Impact Factor