Article

Isolation and molecular characterization of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis from poultry house and clinical samples during 2010.

University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR 72205, USA
Food Microbiology (Impact Factor: 3.37). 04/2014; 38:67-74. DOI: 10.1016/j.fm.2013.08.003
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT A total of 60 Salmonella enterica serovar (ser.) Enteritidis isolates, 28 from poultry houses and 32 from clinical samples, were isolated during 2010. These isolates were subjected to testing and analyzed for antibiotic resistance, virulence genes, plasmids and plasmid replicon types. To assess genetic diversity, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) fingerprinting, using the XbaI restriction enzyme, Multiple-Locus Variable-Number Tandem Repeat Analysis (MLVA) and plasmid profiles were performed. All isolates from poultry, and 10 out of 32 clinical isolates were sensitive to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, kanamycin, nalidixic acid, sulfisoxazole, streptomycin, and tetracycline. Twenty-one of thirty-two clinical isolates were resistant to ampicillin and tetracycline, and one isolate was resistant to nalidixic acid. PFGE typing of sixty ser. Enteritidis isolates by XbaI resulted in 10-12 bands and grouped into six clusters each with similarity from 95% to 81%. The MLVA analysis of sixty isolates gave 18 allele profiles with the majority of isolates displayed in three groups, and two clinical isolates found to be new in the PulseNet national MLVA database. All isolates were positive for 12 or more of the 17 virulence genes mostly found in S. enterica (spvB, spiA, pagC, msgA, invA, sipB, prgH, spaN, orgA, tolC, iroN, sitC, IpfC, sifA, sopB, and pefA) and negative for one gene (cdtB). All isolates carried a typical 58 kb plasmid, type Inc/FIIA. Three poultry isolates and one clinical isolate carried small plasmids with 3.8, 6, 7.6 and 11.5 kb. Ten of the clinical isolates carried plasmids, with sizes 36 and 38 kb, types IncL/M and IncN, and one isolate carried an 81 kb plasmid, type IncI. Southern hybridization of a plasmid with an Inc/FIIA gene probe hybridized one large 58 kb plasmid in all isolates. Several large and small plasmids from poultry isolates were not typed by our PCR-based method. These results confirmed that PFGE fingerprinting has limited discriminatory power for ser. Enteritidis in both poultry and clinical sources. However, the plasmid and MLVA allele profiles were a useful and important epidemiology tool to discriminate outbreak strains of ser. Enteritidis from poultry and clinical samples.

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