Article

Medicine and its discontents.

Menninger Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX. Electronic address: .
Mayo Clinic Proceedings (Impact Factor: 5.81). 12/2013; 88(12):1347-9. DOI: 10.1016/j.mayocp.2013.10.007
Source: PubMed
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