Article

Divergent Transcription: A Driving Force for New Gene Origination?

Computational and Systems Biology Graduate Program, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
Cell (Impact Factor: 33.12). 11/2013; 155(5):990-996. DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2013.10.048
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The mammalian genome is extensively transcribed, a large fraction of which is divergent transcription from promoters and enhancers that is tightly coupled with active gene transcription. Here, we propose that divergent transcription may shape the evolution of the genome by new gene origination.

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