Article

Global health: the importance of evidence-based medicine.

BMC Medicine (Impact Factor: 7.28). 01/2013; 11(1):226.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Global health is a varied field that comprises research, evaluation and policy that, by its definition, also occurs in disparate locations across the world. This forum article is introduced by our guest editor of the Medicine for Global Health article collection, Gretchen Birbeck. Here, experts based across different settings describe their personal experiences of global health, discussing how evidence-based medicine in resource-limited settings can be translated into improved health outcomes.

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