Article

Epidemiological investigation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from a six-year-long hospital outbreak using high-throughput whole genome sequencing.

Institute of Microbiology and Infection, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
Eurosurveillance: bulletin europeen sur les maladies transmissibles = European communicable disease bulletin (Impact Factor: 4.66). 10/2013; 18(42). DOI: 10.2807/1560-7917.ES2013.18.42.20611
Source: PubMed
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