Article

Characterizing Value as an Experience Implications for Service Researchers and Managers

Journal of Service Research (Impact Factor: 2.73). 02/2012; 15(1):59-75. DOI: 10.1177/1094670511426897

ABSTRACT Within contemporary discourse around service-dominant logic, phenomenologically (experientially) determined value has been placed at the center of value discussion. However, a systematic characterization of value in the experience has not been presented to date. In this article, the authors outline four theoretical propositions that describe what value in the experience is, which are then illustrated using a narrative data set. The propositions consider both lived and imaginary value experiences and posit that current service experiences are influenced by previous and anticipated service experiences. The article contributes to the service literature by characterizing value in the experience as an ongoing, iterative circular process of individual, and collective customer sense making, as opposed to a linear, cognitive process restricted to isolated service encounters. The authors recommend that service researchers should consider the use of interpretive methodologies based on the four theoretical propositions outlined in order to better understand the many ways that service customers experience value in their lifeworld contexts, which extend well beyond the service organization’s zone of influence. Service managers should also consider how a richer understanding of past, current, and imaginary value in the context in service customers’ individual lifeworld contexts might generate novel insights for service innovations.

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Available from: Anu Helkkula, Dec 13, 2013
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    • "These experiences could be at the cognitive and subconscious level leading to knowledge growth through interactive processes (Tsai, 2005). Hence creating a superior patient experience is considered key in the value co-creation process (Helkkula et al., 2012; Sandstrom et al., 2008; Spena et al., 2012). These experiences are influenced by the social context within which the encounter takes place (Edvardsson et al., 2011). "
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    ABSTRACT: The increasing awareness that value creation lies in the patient’s sphere, which is facilitated by the relationship between the provider, has consequences for the approach to service delivery. Using a phenomenological approach, this study furthers our understanding of actor value perceptions on value co-creation in the focal doctor-patient dyad. The value perceptions of the patient examined in this study reveal an experiential nature, which is further analysed to show how this is exchanged between the doctor and patient. The findings suggest that patients’ value perceptions are linked to their experiences in the consulting room, whereas doctors primarily consider the functional value. In order to create value for patients, providers need to understand current trends in patient behaviours and attitude during healthcare consultations. Further, they should adopt an approach that engages with these behaviours, resulting in positive experiences.
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    • "These experiences could be at the cognitive and subconscious level leading to knowledge growth through interactive processes (Tsai, 2005). Hence creating a superior patient experience is considered key in the value co-creation process (Helkkula et al., 2012; Sandstrom et al., 2008; Spena et al., 2012). These experiences are influenced by the social context within which the encounter takes place (Edvardsson et al., 2011). "
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate value co-creation processes from the focal dyad of the patient and the physician and how their experiences in the consulting room affect the value that is created. Design/methodology/approach – Semi-structured interviews incorporating the critical incident technique (CIT) were conducted with 8 doctors and 24 outpatients in selected hospitals in Ghana, exploring their experiences during their encounter in the service delivery impacting on the value creating healthcare opportunities. An abductive and thematic analytical approach was used to identify 76 useable critical incidents that had clear consequences on both the outcome of the service and the service experiences of the patient. Findings – The study reveals three critical areas needed to support the value co-creation process and respective elements or activities to be considered during the service encounter. The critical areas comprise of the social context, beliefs and perceptions, and partnership between the focal dyad. The findings also suggests that patients do not consider “getting well” as the only value that they seek, but also the total experiences they go through in the consulting room. Also some physicians find it difficult to accept the recent changes in the patients’ behaviour and attitudes, resulting in knowledge conflict that adversely affects actors’ experiences in the consulting room. Research limitations/implications – The study considered only one of the many professionals in the healthcare delivery, which may affect the true value perceptions of the patient. Practical implications – The study provides service providers understanding of the processes that influence the patients’ experiences and value creation and the changing trends in the patient’s attitudes. The findings suggest a need for providers to take a holistic view of the service delivery and consider the critical areas, which could impact on the overall service outcomes. Originality/value – This study extends the research on CIT to exploring the value co-creating processes in the healthcare setting. This also provides clarity in understanding the interdependence of the two actors and how this is managed as a resource in the value co-creation process at the micro level.
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    • "Perceived value has been described as a dynamic variable, experienced before purchase, at the moment of purchase, at the time of use and after use (Sanchez, Callarisa, Rodríguez, & Moliner, 2006). Marketing management scholars have also noted that, rather than strictly focusing on the core service experience, it is important to examine value perceptions as a process that includes remembered consumption experiences, that is, value in the experience (Helkkula et al., 2012; Tynan et al., 2014). In this sense, value can be formed, fail to be created or destroyed by the experience (Tynan et al., 2014). "
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