Article

The “Wits” appraisal of jaw disharmony

American Journal of Orthodontics 11/2003; 124(5):470–479. DOI: 10.1016/S0889-5406(03)00540-7

ABSTRACT Alex Jacobson was born in South Africa and completed his dental education there in 1941. He received an MS degree in orthodontics from the University of Illinois in Chicago in 1953 and then returned to South Africa to private practice. He was head of the orthodontic department at the University of Witwatersrand (known as Wits, hence the name “Wits” analysis). He received an MDS degree in 1961 and a PhD in physical anthropology in 1978 and was named chair of the orthodontic department at the University of Alabama at Birmingham in 1976. He returned to private practice and part-time teaching again in 1989. He has written or edited 3 textbooks and about 100 articles in refereed journals, and is editor of the Reviews and Abstracts section of the Journal.

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