Article

Establishment of a Radiogenomics Consortium

Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA
Radiotherapy and Oncology (Impact Factor: 4.86). 04/2010; 94(1):117–118. DOI: 10.1016/j.radonc.2009.12.007
6 Followers
 · 
50 Views
  • Source
    • "Radiogenomics is a multi-disciplinary scientific research field aiming to link human genomic variability to a cancer patient's likelihood of developing toxicity following radiotherapy [1]. Over 80 publications to date reported results of studies investigating correlations between genetic markers and radiotherapy toxicity. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Normal-tissue adverse effects following radiotherapy are common and significantly affect quality of life. These effects cannot be accounted for by dosimetric, treatment, or demographic factors alone, and evidence suggests that common genetic variants are associated with radiotherapy adverse effects. The field of radiogenomics has evolved to identify such genetic risk factors. Radiogenomics has two goals: (i) to develop an assay to predict which patients with cancer are most likely to develop radiation injuries resulting from radiotherapy, and (ii) to obtain information about the molecular pathways responsible for radiation-induced normal-tissue toxicities. This review summarizes the history of the field and current research.
    Cancer Discovery 01/2014; 4(2). DOI:10.1158/2159-8290.CD-13-0197 · 19.45 Impact Factor
  • Source
    • "Ils peuvent apparaître à des temps différents (effets précoces ou tardifs), les maladies associées peuvent être variées et classées différemment selon le degré de toxicité, etc. La diversité de ces phénotypes implique donc des combinaisons rares de variations génétiques nombreuses et variées, et l'analyse des données recueillies ne peut alors être pertinente que pour un très grand nombre d'échantillons. Il est donc admis qu'une seule institution ne peut réaliser elle-même une étude d'association du génome en entier avec un résultat suffisamment significatif et que seul un consortium international, représentant plusieurs centres, peut fournir un cadre adéquat pour la validation des futures études [39]. Dans une moindre mesure, le criblage de haut débit a également permis l'étude du transcriptome. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The impact of curative radiotherapy depends mainly on the total dose delivered homogenously in the targeted volume. Nevertheless, the dose delivered to the surrounding healthy tissues may reduce the therapeutic ratio of many radiation treatments. In a same population treated in one center with the same technique, it appears that individual radiosensitivity clearly exists, namely in terms of late side effects that are in principle non-reversible. This review details the different radiobiological approaches that have been developed to better understand the mechanisms of radiation-induced late effects. We also present the possibilities of clinical use of predictive assays in the close future.
    Cancer/Radiothérapie 10/2013; 17(s 5–6):337–343. DOI:10.1016/j.canrad.2013.07.137 · 1.11 Impact Factor
  • Source
    • "Radiogenomics is a multi-disciplinary scientific research field aiming to link human genomic variability to a cancer patient's likelihood of developing toxicity following radiotherapy [1]. Over 80 publications to date reported results of studies investigating correlations between genetic markers and radiotherapy toxicity. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Despite publication of numerous radiogenomics studies to date, positive single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations have rarely been reproduced in independent validation studies. A major reason for these inconsistencies is a high number of false positive findings because no adjustments were made for multiple comparisons. It is also possible that some validation studies were false negatives due to methodological shortcomings or a failure to reproduce relevant details of the original study. Transparent reporting is needed to ensure these flaws do not hamper progress in radiogenomics. In response to the need for improving the quality of research in the area, the Radiogenomics Consortium produced an 18-item checklist for reporting radiogenomics studies. It is recognised that not all studies will have recorded all of the information included in the checklist. However, authors should report on all checklist items and acknowledge any missing information. Use of STROGAR guidelines will advance the field of radiogenomics by increasing the transparency and completeness of reporting.
    Radiotherapy and Oncology 08/2013; 110(1). DOI:10.1016/j.radonc.2013.07.011 · 4.86 Impact Factor
Show more