Article

Augmenting Breath Regulation Using a Mobile Driven Virtual Reality Therapy Framework.

IEEE Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics (Impact Factor: 1.98). 09/2013; DOI: 10.1109/JBHI.2013.2281195
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT This paper presents a conceptual framework of a virtual reality therapy to assist individuals, especially lung cancer patients or those with breathing disorders to regulate their breath through real-time analysis of respiration movements using a smart-phone. Virtual reality technology is an attractive means for medical simulations and treatment, particularly for patients with cancer. The theories, methodologies and approaches, and real-world dynamic contents for all components of this virtual reality therapy (VRT) via a conceptual framework using the smart-phone will be discussed. The architecture and technical aspects of the offshore platform of the virtual environment will also be presented.

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