Article

Antioxidant and vitamin E transport genes and risk of high-grade prostate cancer and prostate cancer recurrence

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California.
The Prostate (Impact Factor: 3.57). 12/2013; 73(16). DOI: 10.1002/pros.22717
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Observational studies suggest an inverse association between vitamin E and risk of prostate cancer, particularly aggressive tumors. However, three large randomized controlled trials have reported conflicting results. Thus, we examined circulating vitamin E and vitamin E-related genes in relation to risk of high-grade prostate cancer and prostate cancer recurrence among men initially diagnosed with clinically organ-confined disease.
We measured circulating α- and γ-tocopherol and genotyped 30 SNPs in SOD1, SOD2, SOD3, TTPA, and SEC14L2 among 573 men with organ-confined prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy. We examined associations between circulating vitamin E, genotypes, and risk of high-grade prostate cancer (Gleason grade ≥ 8 or 7 with primary score ≥ 4; n = 117) using logistic regression, and risk of recurrence (56 events; 3.7 years median follow-up) using Cox proportional hazards regression.
Circulating γ-tocopherol was associated with an increased risk of high-grade prostate cancer (Q4 v. Q1 odds ratio [OR] = 1.87; 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 0.97-3.58; Ptrend = 0.02). The less common allele in SOD3 rs699473 was associated with an increased risk of high-grade disease (T > C: OR = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.04-1.89). Two independent SNPs in SOD1 were inversely associated with prostate cancer recurrence in additive models (rs17884057 hazard ratio [HR] = 0.49, 95%CI: 0.25-0.96; rs9967983 HR = 0.62, 95% CI: 0.40-0.95).
Among men with clinically organ-confined prostate cancer, genetic variation in SOD may be associated with risk of high-grade disease at diagnosis and disease recurrence. Circulating γ-tocopherol levels may also be associated with an increased risk of high-grade disease at diagnosis. Prostate © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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