Article

Aortic Root Remodeling and Risk of Heart Failure in the Framingham Heart Study

Preventive Medicine and Cardiology Sections, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts.
JACC. Heart failure 02/2013; 1(1):79-83. DOI: 10.1016/j.jchf.2012.10.003
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to investigate the association between aortic root remodeling and incident heart failure (HF).
Age-associated increases in aortic root diameter (AoD) might be associated with arterial stiffening, afterload changes, cardiac remodeling, and the development of HF.
The study sample consisted of participants of the Framingham Heart Study Original and Offspring cohorts who underwent serial echocardiographic measurements of AoD and continuous surveillance for new-onset HF. The AoD was measured at baseline, and the change in AoD between 8-year examination cycles was calculated. Pooled repeated observations (total 13,605 person-observations) in multivariable Cox regression analyses were used to relate baseline AoD and change in AoD to the incidence of HF on follow-up. Models were adjusted for known HF risk factors (age, sex, body mass index, blood pressure, hypertension treatment, diabetes, smoking, prior myocardial infarction, and valve disease).
With adjustment for clinical risk factors, the risk of incident HF increased with greater AoD at baseline (hazard ratio: 1.19/1 SD; 95% confidence interval: 1.07 to 1.33) as well as increases in AoD over 8 years (hazard ratio: 1.20/1 SD; 95% confidence interval: 1.04 to 1.38). The AoD correlated with left ventricular mass (r = 0.50; p < 0.001). After adjustment for left ventricular mass in addition to clinical risk factors, the association of AoD with incident HF was rendered nonsignificant.
Aortic root remodeling is associated with future risk of HF among middle-aged and older adults in the community, potentially because it reflects parallel ventricular-vascular remodeling in those with an enlarged aortic root. Additional studies are warranted to confirm our findings.

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