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[Adalimumab for the Treatment of Adult Crohn's Disease - Update of a Consensus Report by the Working Group Inflammatory Bowel Disease of the Austrian Society of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.]

Klinische Abteilung für Gastroenterologie und Hepatologie, Universitätsklinik für Innere Medizin III, Medizinische Universität Wien, Österreich.
Zeitschrift für Gastroenterologie (Impact Factor: 1.67). 08/2013; DOI: 10.1055/s-0033-1350165
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT TNF alpha antibodies have clearly improved the outcome of moderate to severe Crohn's disease. Adalimumab is the first fully human, monoclonal TNF alpha antibody, which can be self-administered subcutaneously. Since August 2012 adalimumab is approved for the treatment of moderately to severely active Crohn's disease, in patients who have not responded despite a full and adequate course of therapy with a corticosteroid and/or an immunosuppressant or who are intolerant to or have medical contraindications for such therapies. Compared to placebo adalimumab can induce significantly more often steroid-free remission and mucosal healing in patients with moderate to severe Crohn's disease, reduce the rate of Crohn's disease-related hospitalisations and surgery and improve health-related quality of life. Adalimumab is clinically efficacious both in patients with Crohn's disease naïve to previous exposure to TNF-alpha antibodies and in those previously exposed with a rapid onset of action within days and confirmed maintenance performance over 3 years. The safety profile of adalimumab is comparable to those of other TNF alpha inhibitors. Due to its low immunogenicity allergic reactions are rare. The update of a consensus report by the Working Group Inflammatory Bowel Disease of the Austrian Society of Gastroenterology and Hepatology presents the existing evidence on adalimumab for the treatment of Crohn's disease and is aimed to assist as a code of practice in its applications.

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Gottfried Novacek