Plasmonic Photothermal Heating of Intraperitoneal Tumors through the Use of an Implanted Near-Infrared Source

Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, ¶Health Sciences and Technology, and #Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology , Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States.
ACS Nano (Impact Factor: 12.88). 08/2013; 7(9). DOI: 10.1021/nn4033757
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Plasmonic nanomaterials including gold nanorods are effective agents for inducing heating in tumors. Because near-infrared (NIR) light has traditionally been delivered using extracorporeal sources, most applications of plasmonic photothermal therapy have focused on isolated subcutaneous tumors. For more complex models of disease such as advanced ovarian cancer, one of the primary barriers to gold nanorod-based strategies is the adequate delivery of NIR light to tumors located at varying depths within the body. To address this limitation, a series of implanted NIR illumination sources are described for the specific heating of gold nanorod-containing tissues. Through computational modeling and ex vivo studies, a candidate device is identified and validated in a model of orthotopic ovarian cancer. As the therapeutic, imaging, and diagnostic applications of plasmonic nanomaterials progress, effective methods for NIR light delivery to challenging anatomical regions will complement ongoing efforts to advance plasmonic photothermal therapy toward clinical use.

32 Reads
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Nanotechnology plays an increasingly important role not only in our everyday life (with all its benefits and dangers) but also in medicine. Nanoparticles are to date the most intriguing option to deliver high concentrations of agents specifically and directly to cancer cells; therefore, a wide variety of these nanomaterials has been developed and explored. These span the range from simple nanoagents to sophisticated smart devices for drug delivery or imaging. Nanomaterials usually provide a large surface area, allowing for decoration with a large amount of moieties on the surface for either additional functionalities or targeting. Besides using particles solely for imaging purposes, they can also carry as a payload a therapeutic agent. If both are combined within the same particle, a theranostic agent is created. The sophistication of highly developed nanotechnology targeting approaches provides a promising means for many clinical implementations and can provide improved applications for otherwise suboptimal formulations. In this review we will explore nanotechnology both for imaging and therapy to provide a general overview of the field and its impact on cancer imaging and therapy.
    Critical reviews in oncogenesis 10/2014; 19(3-4):143-176. DOI:10.1615/CritRevOncog.2014011601
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Here we report the synthesis of PLGA/DOXO-core Au-branched shell nanostructures (BGNSHs) functionalized with a human serum albumin/indocyanine green/folic acid complex (HSA-ICG-FA) to configure a multifunctional nanotheranostic platform. First, branched gold nanoshells (BGNSHs) were obtained through a seeded-growth surfactant-less method. These BGNSHs were loaded during the synthetic process with the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin, a DNA intercalating agent and topoisomerase II inhibitior. In parallel, the fluorescent near-infrared (NIR) dye indocyanine green (ICG) was conjugated to the protein human serum albumin (HSA) by electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Subsequently, folic acid was covalently attached to the HSA-ICG complex. In this way, we created a protein complex with targeting specificity and fluorescent imaging capability. The resulting HSA-ICG-FA complex was adsorbed to the gold nanostructures surface (BGNSH-HSA-ICG-FA) in a straightforward incubation process thanks to the high affinity of HSA to gold surface. In this manner, BGNSH-HSA-ICG-FA platforms were featured with multifunctional abilities: the possibility of fluorescence imaging for diagnosis and therapy monitoring by exploiting the inherent fluorescence of the dye, and a multimodal therapy approach consisting of the simultaneous combination of chemotherapy, provided by the loaded drug, and the potential cytotoxic effect of photodynamic and photothermal therapies provided by the dye and the gold nanolayer of the hybrid structure, respectively, upon NIR light irradiation of suitable wavelength. The combination of this trimodal approach was observed to exert a synergistic effect on the cytotoxicity of tumoral cells in vitro. Furthermore, FA was proved to enhance the internalization of nanoplatform. The ability of the nanoplatforms as fluorescence imaging contrast agents was tested by preliminary analyzing their biodistribution in vivo in a tumor-bearing mice model.
    ACS Nano 02/2014; 8(3):2725-2738. DOI:10.1021/nn406425h · 12.88 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Noninvasive techniques, such as breath tests (urea breath test), blood pressure measurements using a sphygmomanometer and electrocardiography, were employed by a physician to perform classical diagnosis. The use of state-of-the-art noninvasive therapies at the organ level in modern medicine has gradually become possible. However, cancer treatment demands spatially and temporally controlled noninvasive therapy at the cell level because nonspecific toxicity often causes complicated side effects. To increase survival in cancer patients further, combination therapy and combination drugs are explored which demand high specificity to avoid combined-drug side effects. We believe that high specificity could be obtained by implementing near-infrared (NIR) light-assisted nanoparticles in photothermal therapy, chemotherapy, and photodynamic therapy. To refine this therapy and subsequently achieve high efficiency, novel nanomaterials have been designed and modified either to enhance the uptake and drug delivery to the cancer site, or control treatment to administer therapy efficiently. These modifications and developments have been demonstrated to achieve spatial and temporal control when conducting an in vivo xenograft, because the NIR light penetrated effectively the biological tissue. The nanoplatforms discussed in this review are grouped under the following subheadings: Au nanorods (NRs), Au nanoshells, other Au-related nanomaterials, graphene oxide, upconversion nanoparticles, and other related materials (including materials such as CuS, Fe3O4-related systems, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs)).
    Chemical Society Reviews 05/2014; 43(17). DOI:10.1039/c4cs00011k · 33.38 Impact Factor
Show more

Preview (4 Sources)

32 Reads
Available from