Article

The Developmental Approach to Child and Adult Health

University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States
Pediatrics (Impact Factor: 5.3). 12/2012; 131. DOI: 10.1542/peds.2013-0252d

ABSTRACT Pediatricians should consider the costs and benefits of preventing rather than treating childhood diseases. We present an integrated developmental approach to child and adult health that considers the costs and benefits of interventions over the life cycle. We suggest policies to promote child health which are currently outside the boundaries of conventional pediatrics. We discuss current challenges to the field and suggest avenues for future research.

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