Article

Why are Iraq and Afghanistan War veterans seeking PTSD disability compensation at unprecedented rates?

Department of Psychology, Harvard University, William James Hall, 33 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, MA 2138, United States. Electronic address: .
Journal of anxiety disorders (Impact Factor: 2.68). 07/2013; 27(5):520-526. DOI: 10.1016/j.janxdis.2013.07.002
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have produced historically low rates of fatalities, injuries, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among U.S. combatants. Yet they have also produced historically unprecedented rates of PTSD disability compensation seeking from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. The purpose of this article is to consider hypotheses that might potentially resolve this paradox, including high rates of PTSD, delayed onset PTSD, malingered PTSD, and economic variables.

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