Article

Reference ranges for sonographic dimensions of the liver and spleen in preterm infants

Department of Pediatrics, The Ministry of Health Tepecik Teaching and Research Hospital, Gaziler Street, Yenisehir, Izmir, Turkey.
Pediatric Radiology (Impact Factor: 1.65). 08/2013; 43(11). DOI: 10.1007/s00247-013-2729-7
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Preterm infants usually have multiple comorbidities that affect spleen and liver. Ultrasonographic measurement of organ sizes is an important and reliable parameter in evaluation of spleen and liver pathology in preterm newborns.
The purpose of this study was to determine reference values of ultrasonographic measurements of the liver and spleen in preterm newborns.
We prospectively performed sonography on 498 preterm newborns in the first week of life. We measured spleen and liver dimensions and statistically analyzed relationships between the dimensions and gender, gestational age (based on mother's last menstrual period), height and weight. Reference ranges of dimensions were defined.
Longitudinal and anteroposterior dimensions of the liver and spleen were statistically significantly different between the boys and girls (P < 0.05) and showed high correlation with the gestational age, weight and height. Weight was the parameter best correlated with the dimensions.
Nomograms from these data are useful for sonographic evaluation of the liver and spleen in preterm newborns.

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