Why Become a Pornography Actress?

International Journal of Sexual Health (Impact Factor: 0.36). 07/2012; 24(3). DOI: 10.1080/19317611.2012.666514

ABSTRACT There is very limited research on women who perform in adult films. The current study used a discovery oriented qualitative methodology to examine the responses of 176 female actresses in the adult entertainment industry to questions regarding the reasons for becoming involved in the pornography industry, as well as their likes and dislikes of the work. The most frequent reasons for joining the industry included money, sex, and attention. Only one participant indicated that she was coerced into becoming a porn actress. The most favorable aspects of their work included money, people, sex, and freedom/independence, whereas the most frequently reported dislikes included people, sexually transmitted diseases, and exploitation. The responses from this study provide valuable insight from a large sample of a difficult to access population of pornography actresses on why they chose to become involved in the pornography industry as well as positive and negative facets of their work. The results may be used to question many of the stereotypes that society commonly holds regarding attributes of female pornography actresses.

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