Article

The pathophysiology of hyperuricaemia and its possible relationship to cardiovascular disease, morbidity and mortality.

BMC Nephrology (Impact Factor: 1.52). 07/2013; 14(1):164. DOI: 10.1186/1471-2369-14-164
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Uric acid is the end product of purine metabolism in humans. High levels are causative in gout and urolithiasis. Hyperuricaemia has also been implicated in the pathophysiology of hypertension, chronic kidney disease (CKD), congestive heart failure (CHF), the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and atherosclerosis, with or without cardiovascular events. This article briefly reviews uric acid metabolism and summarizes the current literature on hyperuricaemia in cardiovascular disease and related co-morbidities, and emerging treatment options.

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