Article

A Performance Comparison Of Four Buffering Schemes For Multistage Interconnection Networks

08/2002;
Source: CiteSeer

ABSTRACT Multistage interconnection networks (MINs) are used to connect processors and memories in large-scale multiprocessor systems. MINs have also been proposed as switching fabrics in ATM networks. A MIN consists of several stages of small crossbar switching elements (SEs). A number of buffering schemes are used in the SEs to increase the throughput of MINs and prevent internal loss of packets. the objective of this article is to compare the performance of MINs using different buffering schemes in the presence of uniform and nonuniform traffic patterns. The results obtained from the study will help computer architects and network designers in choosing appropriate buffering strategies for fabric design and configuration of MINs. The normalized throughput, packet loss, and packet mean delay have been used as the performance measures for comparing the different buffering strategies. Results show that the performance of split-shared and output-buffered MINs is considerably better than that of input-buffered MINs when the hot request rate is low. However, the performance is identical for all the buffering schemes when the hot request rate is medium or high.

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