Article

Premature mortality in epilepsy and the role of psychiatric comorbidity: a total population study

University of Oxford, Department of Psychiatry, Warneford Hospital, Warneford Lane, Headington, Oxford, UK. Electronic address: .
The Lancet (Impact Factor: 39.21). 07/2013; 382(9905). DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(13)60899-5
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Epilepsy is associated with high rates of premature mortality, but the contribution of psychiatric comorbidity is uncertain. We assessed the prevalence and risks of premature mortality from external causes such as suicide, accidents, and assaults in people with epilepsy with and without psychiatric comorbidity.
We studied all individuals born in Sweden between 1954 and 2009 with inpatient and outpatient diagnoses of epilepsy (n=69 995) for risks and causes of premature mortality. Patients were compared with age-matched and sex-matched general population controls (n=660 869) and unaffected siblings (n=81 396). Sensitivity analyses were done to investigate whether these odds differed by sex, age, seizure types, comorbid psychiatric diagnosis, and different time periods after epilepsy diagnosis.
6155 (8.8%) people with epilepsy died during follow-up, at a median age of 34·5 (IQR 21·0-44·0) years with substantially elevated odds of premature mortality (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] of 11·1 [95% CI 10·6-11·6] compared with general population controls, and 11·4 [10·4-12·5] compared with unaffected siblings). Of those deaths, 15·8% (n=972) were from external causes, with high odds for non-vehicle accidents (aOR 5·5, 95 % CI 4·7-6·5) and suicide (3·7, 3·3-4·2). Of those who died from external causes, 75·2% had comorbid psychiatric disorders, with strong associations in individuals with co-occurring depression (13·0, 10·3-16·6) and substance misuse (22·4, 18·3-27·3), compared with patients with no epilepsy and no psychiatric comorbidity.
Reducing premature mortality from external causes of death should be a priority in epilepsy management. Psychiatric comorbidity plays an important part in the premature mortality seen in epilepsy. The ability of health services and public health measures to prevent such deaths requires review.
Wellcome Trust, the Swedish Prison and Probation Service, and the Swedish Research Council.

Full-text

Available from: Seena Fazel, May 05, 2015
0 Followers
 · 
147 Views
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Psychiatric comorbidities are relatively frequent in people with epilepsy, occurring in one of every three patients, with mood and anxiety disorders predominating. They are the expression of a complex interaction between a previous psychiatric history (and/or genetic predisposition for psychiatric disorder), neurobiologic changes associated with the underlying epilepsy, peri-ictal phenomena, iatrogenic and reactive processes. Furthermore, a bidirectional relation between psychiatric disorders and epilepsy has added another level of complexity, while at the same time opening an opportunity of the recognition of potential pathogenic mechanisms that are responsible for the high comorbid occurrence of these disorders. This article highlights the clinical implications of understanding the course of psychiatric comorbidities relative to the onset of the seizure disorder to minimize their risk of recurrence and their interference in the management of the seizure disorder.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Epilepsy is a chronic neurological condition that affects approximately 70 million people worldwide. Characterised by sudden bursts of excess electricity in the brain, manifesting as seizures, epilepsy is still not well understood when compared with other neurological disorders. Seizures often happen unexpectedly and attempting to predict them has been a research topic for the last 30 years. Electroencephalograms have been integral to these studies, as the recordings that they produce can capture the brain’s electrical signals. The diagnosis of epilepsy is usually made by a neurologist, but can be difficult to make in the early stages. Supporting para-clinical evidence obtained from magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography may enable clinicians to make a diagnosis of epilepsy and instigate treatment earlier. However, electroencephalogram capture and interpretation is time consuming and can be expensive due to the need for trained specialists to perform the interpretation. Automated detection of correlates of seizure activity generalised across different regions of the brain and across multiple subjects may be a solution. This paper explores this idea further and presents a supervised machine learning approach that classifies seizure and non-seizure records using an open dataset containing 342 records (171 seizures and 171 non-seizures). Our approach posits a new method for generalising seizure detection across different subjects without prior knowledge about the focal point of seizures. Our results show an improvement on existing studies with 88% for sensitivity, 88% for specificity and 93% for the area under the curve, with a 12% global error, using the k-NN classifier.
    02/2015; 382. DOI:10.1016/j.aci.2015.01.001
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We conducted a community survey to estimate the prevalence and describe the features, risk factors, and consequences of convulsive status epilepticus (CSE) among people with active convulsive epilepsy (ACE) identified in a multisite survey in Africa. We obtained clinical histories of CSE and neurologic examination data among 1,196 people with ACE identified from a population of 379,166 people in 3 sites: Agincourt, South Africa; Iganga-Mayuge, Uganda; and Kilifi, Kenya. We performed serologic assessment for the presence of antibodies to parasitic infections and HIV and determined adherence to antiepileptic drugs. Consequences of CSE were assessed using a questionnaire. Logistic regression was used to identify risk factors. The adjusted prevalence of CSE in ACE among the general population across the 3 sites was 2.3 per 1,000, and differed with site (p < 0.0001). Over half (55%) of CSE occurred in febrile illnesses and focal seizures were present in 61%. Risk factors for CSE in ACE were neurologic impairments, acute encephalopathy, previous hospitalization, and presence of antibody titers to falciparum malaria and HIV; these differed across sites. Burns (15%), lack of education (49%), being single (77%), and unemployment (78%) were common in CSE; these differed across the 3 sites. Nine percent with and 10% without CSE died. CSE is common in people with ACE in Africa; most occurs with febrile illnesses, is untreated, and has focal features suggesting preventable risk factors. Effective prevention and the management of infections and neurologic impairments may reduce the burden of CSE in ACE. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.
    Neurology 04/2015; DOI:10.1212/WNL.0000000000001542 · 8.30 Impact Factor