Article

Which Blair Project?: Communitarianism, Social Authoritarianism and Social Work

Journal of Social Work (Impact Factor: 1). 01/2001; 1(1):7-19. DOI: 10.1177/146801730100100102

ABSTRACT This article provides an analysis of the current ideological and political context through which the nature and identity of social work are being constructed. The analysis briefly traces the development of social policy during the Conservative administrations in the UK between 1979 and 1997: and then a more detailed analysis is undertaken of the period since 1997 under the New Labour government of Tony Blair.

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