Article

Police use of deadly force: Research and reform

Justice Quarterly (Impact Factor: 1.63). 01/1988; 5(2):165-205. DOI: 10.1080/07418828800089691

ABSTRACT Police use of deadly force first became a major public issue in the 1960s, when many urban riots were precipitated immediately by police killings of citizens. Since that time scholars have studied deadly force extensively, police practitioners have made significant reforms in their policies and practices regarding deadly force, and the United States Supreme Court has voided a centuries-old legal principle that authorized police in about one-half the states to use deadly force to apprehend unarmed, nonviolent, fleeing felony suspects. This essay reviews and interprets these developments.

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