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The Use of Rockfall Protection Systems in Surface Mining Activity

International Journal of Surface Mining Reclamation and Environment 01/2003; 17(1):51-64. DOI: 10.1076/ijsm.17.1.51.8625

ABSTRACT In many cases open pits in mountainous areas are subjected to the collapse of rock boulders (rockfall), which can reach the quarry area and create safety hazards for both personnel and mine infrastructure. The paper demonstrates that net fences widely used for control and risk mitigation of rockfall in civil and road constructions, can be used successfully also for mining activities, with special reference to ornamental stone quarries. A description of this protection technique and the design key points are highlighted and discussed.

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    • "Indeed, a reliable approach for designing slopes, portals, roads and ramps depends critically on suitable rockfall protection systems. Over the last three decades rockfall has been widely studied for roads and highways [1] [2] [3] [4], but it is only recently that it has been accounted for in the context of open pits, quarries, [5] [6] [7] [8] and underground mines [9] [10]. Data collected from worldwide databases show that rockfall is one of the most serious causes of injury in mining operations [8,10–16] and several fatal events have been recorded since the mid 1990s. "
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    ABSTRACT: This study presents in situ experiments carried out at an open cut mine in New South Wales (Australia). The research intends to improve the current knowledge on drapery systems for rockfall hazard management in mining environments. Blocks were released from the top of two different sections of the highwall: with and without a rockfall drapery system installed on the highwall. The trajectories of the blocks were recorded by using synchronised stereo pairs of high speed cameras. Velocities were derived from the trajectories and used to gather rockfall motion parameters (restitution coefficients) and various energies.
    International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciences 12/2012; 56:171–181. DOI:10.1016/j.ijrmms.2012.07.030 · 1.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes an empirical method, called Rockfall Risk Assessment for Quarries (ROFRAQ), which assesses the risk associated with rock falls in quarries. The method is based on aprobabilistic approach that assumes that an accident occurs as a consequence of as equence of events. This method has been applied to slopes in a number of quarries, and has proved useful indetecting trouble some slopes on the basis of empirical evidence. Thus far, it has been applied to around 100 slopes from various quarries of different rocks. These results show satisfactory agreement with results for empirical methods applied in the civil engineering field to highways and roads. The authors describe a case study of a granite aggregate quarry that highlights a number of issues in relation to practical application of the method.
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper describes an empirical method, called Rockfall Risk Assessment for Quarries (ROFRAQ), which assesses the risk associated with rockfalls in quarries. The method is based on a probabilistic approach that assumes that an accident occurs as a consequence of a sequence of events. This method has been applied to slopes in a number of quarries, and has proved useful in detecting troublesome slopes on the basis of empirical evidence. Thus far, it has been applied to around 100 slopes from various quarries of different rocks. These results show satisfactory agreement with results for empirical methods applied in the civil engineering field to highways and roads. The authors describe a case study of a granite aggregate quarry that highlights a number of issues in relation to practical application of the method.
    International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciences 12/2008; 45(8-45):1252-1272. DOI:10.1016/j.ijrmms.2008.01.003 · 1.42 Impact Factor
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