Article

The Use of Rockfall Protection Systems in Surface Mining Activity

International Journal of Surface Mining Reclamation and Environment 01/2003; 17(1):51-64. DOI: 10.1076/ijsm.17.1.51.8625

ABSTRACT In many cases open pits in mountainous areas are subjected to the collapse of rock boulders (rockfall), which can reach the quarry area and create safety hazards for both personnel and mine infrastructure. The paper demonstrates that net fences widely used for control and risk mitigation of rockfall in civil and road constructions, can be used successfully also for mining activities, with special reference to ornamental stone quarries. A description of this protection technique and the design key points are highlighted and discussed.

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