Article

Obesity alters the gustatory perception of lipids in the mouse: Plausible involvement of lingual CD36

Physiologie de la Nutrition et Toxicologie (NUTox) UMR U866 INSERM/uB/AgroSup Dijon, France.
The Journal of Lipid Research (Impact Factor: 4.73). 07/2013; DOI: 10.1194/jlr.M039446
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT A relationship between oro-sensory detection of dietary lipids, regulation of fat intake and body mass index was recently suggested. However, involved mechanisms are poorly understood. Moreover, whether obesity can directly modulate preference for fatty foods remains unknown. To address this question, exploration of the oral lipid sensing system was undertaken in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice. By using a combination of biochemical, physiological and behavioral approaches, we found that i) the attraction for lipids is decreased in obese mice, ii) this behavioral change has an oro-sensory origin, iii) it is reversed in calorie-restricted DIO mice, revealing an inverse correlation between fat preference and adipose tissue size, iv) obesity suppresses the lipid-mediated down-regulation of the lipid-sensor CD36 in circumvallate papillae, usually found during the refeeding of lean mice and v) the CD36-dependent signaling cascade controlling the intracellular calcium levels ([Ca2+]i) in taste bud cells is decreased in obese mice. Therefore, obesity alters the lipid sensing system responsible for the oral perception of dietary lipids via a CD36-mediated mechanism, leading to changes in the eating behavior.

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Available from: Souleymane Abdoul-Azize, Aug 07, 2014
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    • "Dietary intake data were collected from a subset of adult participants to examine whether previous intake influenced fat taste sensitivity. Rodent data suggests that dietary fat exposure decreases both CD36 mRNA and protein expression (Martin et al. 2011), but only in lean animals (Chevrot et al. 2013). CD36 is a putative nonesterified fatty acid receptor that is activated by LA (Gaillard et al. 2008). "
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    • "Dietary intake data were collected from a subset of adult participants to examine whether previous intake influenced fat taste sensitivity. Rodent data suggests that dietary fat exposure decreases both CD36 mRNA and protein expression (Martin et al. 2011), but only in lean animals (Chevrot et al. 2013). CD36 is a putative nonesterified fatty acid receptor that is activated by LA (Gaillard et al. 2008). "
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