Article

Sex differences in jealousy over Facebook activity.

Computers in Human Behavior (Impact Factor: 2.27). 01/2013; 29(6):2603-2606. DOI: 10.1016/j.chb.2013.06.030

ABSTRACT Forty heterosexual undergraduate students (24 females, 16 males) who were currently in a romantic relationship filled out a modified version of The Facebook Jealousy questionnaire (Muise, Christofides, & Desmarais, 2009). The questionnaire was filled out twice, once with the participant’s own personal responses, and a second time with what each participant imagined that his/her romantic partner’s responses would be like. The data indicated that females were more prone to Facebook-evoked feelings of jealousy and to jealousy-motivated behavior than males. Males accurately predicted these sex differences in response to the jealousy scale, but females seemed unaware that their male partners would be less jealous than themselves.

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May 27, 2014