Article

Pursuing Personal Goals: Skills Enable Progress, but Not all Progress is Beneficial

Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin (Impact Factor: 2.52). 12/1998; 24(12):1319-1331. DOI: 10.1177/01461672982412006

ABSTRACT Although goal theorists have speculated about the causes and consequences of making progress at personal goals, little longitudinal research has examined these issues. In the current prospective study, participants with stronger social and self-regulatory skills made more progress in their goals over the course of a semester. In turn, goal progress predicted increases in psychological well-being, both in short-term (5-day) increments and across the whole semester; At both short- and long-term levels of analysis, however, the amount that well-being increased depended on the "organismic congruence" of participants' goals. That is, participants benefited most from goal attainment when the goals that they pursued were consistent with inherent psychological needs. We conclude that a fuller understanding of the relations between goals, performance, and psychological well-being requires recourse to both cybernetic and organismic theories of motivation.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
119 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The desire for fame appears to be an aspiration for many people, which is associated with material wealth, social recognition and admiration. Recently, reality TV has provided the opportunity for ordinary people to become famous with little effort or outstanding achievement. A literature review revealed no scale to measure the desire for fame that is not specifically concerned with celebrity worship, but related to the perception of lifestyle benefits associated with being famous. This study tests the desire for fame and its association with intrinsic and extrinsic aspirations. An online survey was conducted using a sample of 507 people. Hierarchical regression suggests significant positive and negative relationships with extrinsic and intrinsic aspirations. The social and marketing implications of the research are discussed and suggestions made for future research.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The present paper proposes an integrative model on the motivational determinants and health consequences of two forms of well-being (i.e., happiness and self-realization). This model posits that pursuing autonomous goals enhances both happiness and self-realization, whereas pursuing controlled goals thwarts these two same forms of well-being. The model further posits that self-realization, but not happiness, promotes physical health via the practise of more vigilant and less avoidant coping strategies, that lead to reduced stress. Empirical support for the model is reviewed and the model is discussed in terms of its theoretical and research implications. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved)
    Canadian Psychology/Psychologie canadienne. 01/2008; 49(3):241.
  • Source