Article

Uncoupling fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 ligand binding specificity leads to Apert syndrome-like phenotypes

Washington University in St. Louis, San Luis, Missouri, United States
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Impact Factor: 9.81). 04/2001; 98(7). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.081082498
Source: PubMed Central

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Available from: David Ornitz, Jan 25, 2014
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