Article

Transurethral Partial Cystectomy With Continuous Wave Laser for Bladder Carcinoma

Department of Urology, People's Liberation Army General Hospital, Beijing, China.
The Journal of urology (Impact Factor: 3.75). 06/2009; 182(1):66-9. DOI: 10.1016/j.juro.2009.02.154
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To our knowledge we established a new technique to vaporize and incise the full-thickness bladder wall and peel off the entire muscular layers with a 2 microm continuous wave laser to treat bladder carcinoma.
Nine patients were treated transurethrally with a 2 microm laser under sacral block. This 2 microm laser was used to incise the full-thickness bladder wall around the tumors. The entire bladder wall was peeled between the detrusor muscle layer and outer connective tissues. Tumors with full-thickness detrusor muscle layers at the base were removed together and sent for pathological examination. Intraoperative hemorrhage and postoperative complications were observed, and pathological staging and postoperative followup were performed.
All operations were successful. Mean +/- SD operative time was 8.7 +/- 2.6 minutes (range 7 to 15) per patient. Perioperative blood loss was minimal. There was no obturator nerve reflection and no hemorrhage was detected after surgery. Bladder perforation occurred in 1 case. Pathological stage of the tumors was T1 and T2a. Patients were followed for 6 to 9 months postoperatively with no recurrence at the resection site. This series included highly selected patients treated by a single high volume surgeon.
To our knowledge this is the first report of a 2 microm laser used to treat bladder carcinoma. It can be applied to precisely vaporize and incise the full-thickness bladder wall and peel it between detrusor muscle layers and outer loose connective tissues, thus completing partial cystectomy for bladder carcinoma.

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