Article

[Assessment of functional capacity, psychological well-being and mental health in primary care].

Departamento de Psicología de la Salud, Universidad de Alicante, Alicante, España.
Atención Primaria (Impact Factor: 0.96). 06/2009; 41(9):515-9. DOI: 10.1016/j.aprim.2008.10.015
Source: PubMed
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