Article

Assessment of recovery after day surgery using a modified version of quality of recovery-40.

Kalmar County Council, Kalmar, Sweden.
Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica (Impact Factor: 2.36). 06/2009; 53(5):673-7. DOI: 10.1111/j.1399-6576.2009.01914.x
Source: PubMed
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