Tropheryma whipplei infection

Department of Medicine (Gastroenterology), University of British Columbia Hospital, 2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver V6T 1W5, Canada.
World Journal of Gastroenterology (Impact Factor: 2.37). 06/2009; 15(17):2078-80. DOI: 10.3748/wjg.15.2078
Source: PubMed


Whipple's disease was initially described in 1907. Over the next century, the clinical and pathological features of this disorder have been better appreciated. Most often, weight loss, diarrhea, abdominal and joint pain occur. Occasionally, other sites of involvement have been documented, including isolated neurological disease, changes in the eyes and culture-negative endocarditis. In the past decade, the responsible organism Tropheryma whipplei has been cultivated, its genome sequenced and its antibiotic susceptibility defined. Although rare, it is a systemic infection that may mimic a wide spectrum of clinical disorders and may have a fatal outcome. If recognized, prolonged antibiotic therapy may be a very successful form of treatment.

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    • "The evolution is fatal without treatment. Treatment is based on long-term antibiotic therapy associating trimethoprime and sulfamethoxazole for 1 to 2 years [8]. "

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