Article

Development of immunoglobulin lambda-chain-positive B cells, but not editing of immunoglobulin kappa-chain, depends on NF-kappa B signals

Immune Disease Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
Nature Immunology (Impact Factor: 24.97). 07/2009; 10(6):647-54. DOI: 10.1038/ni.1732
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT By genetically ablating IkappaB kinase (IKK)-mediated activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB in the B cell lineage and by analyzing a mouse mutant in which immunoglobulin lambda-chain-positive B cells are generated in the absence of rearrangements in the locus encoding immunoglobulin kappa-chain, we define here two distinct, consecutive phases of early B cell development that differ in their dependence on IKK-mediated NF-kappaB signaling. During the first phase, in which NF-kappaB signaling is dispensable, predominantly kappa-chain-positive B cells are generated, which undergo efficient receptor editing. In the second phase, predominantly lambda-chain-positive B cells are generated whose development is ontogenetically timed to occur after rearrangements of the locus encoding kappa-chain. This second phase of development is dependent on NF-kappaB signals, which can be substituted by transgenic expression of the prosurvival factor Bcl-2.

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Available from: Geert van Loo, Jan 31, 2014
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