Article

A variable torque motor compatible with magnetic resonance imaging

Tu and Yuen Center for Functional Onco-Imaging, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-5020, USA.
The Review of scientific instruments (Impact Factor: 1.58). 05/2009; 80(4):046108. DOI: 10.1063/1.3120522
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT High magnetic fields used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) do not allow the employment of conventional motors due to various incompatibility issues. This paper reports on a new motor that can operate in or near high field magnets used for MRI. The motor was designed to be operational with the MRI equipment and could be used in a rotating imaging gantry inside the magnet designed for dual modality imaging. Furthermore, it could also be used for image guided robotic interventional procedures inside a MRI system if so desired. The prototype motor was developed using magnetic resonance (MR) compatible materials, and its functionality with MR imaging was evaluated experimentally by measuring the performance of the motor and its effect on the MR image quality. Since in our application, namely, single photon emission tomography, the motor has to perform precise stepping of the gantry in small angular steps the most important parameter is the start-up torque. The experimental results showed that the motor has a start-up torque up to 1.37 Nm and rotates at 196 rpm when a constant voltage difference of 12 V is applied at a magnetic field strength of 1 T. The MR image quality was quantified by measuring the signal-to-noise of images acquired under different conditions. The results presented here indicate that the motor is MR compatible and could be used for rotating an imaging gantry or a surgical device inside the magnet.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
74 Views
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can provide specific functional information while magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide high-spatial resolution anatomical information as well as complementary functional information. In this study, we utilized a dual modality SPECT/MRI (MRSPECT) system to investigate the integration of SPECT and MRI for improved image accuracy. The MRSPECT system consisted of a cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) nuclear radiation detector interfaced with a specialized radiofrequency (RF) coil that was placed within a whole-body 4 T MRI system. The importance of proper corrections for non-uniform detector sensitivity and Lorentz force effects was demonstrated. MRI data were utilized for attenuation correction (AC) of the nuclear projection data and optimized Wiener filtering of the SPECT reconstruction for improved image accuracy. Finally, simultaneous dual-imaging of a nude mouse was performed to demonstrated the utility of co-registration for accurate localization of a radioactive source.
    Technology in cancer research & treatment 02/2010; 9(1):21-8. DOI:10.1177/153303461000900103 · 1.94 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In medical imaging, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can provide specific functional information while magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide high spatial resolution anatomical information as well as complementary functional information. In this study, we developed a miniaturized dual-modality SPECT/MRI (MRSPECT) system and demonstrated the feasibility of simultaneous SPECT and MRI data acquisition, with the possibility of whole-body MRSPECT systems through suitable scaling of components. For our MRSPECT system, a cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) nuclear radiation detector was interfaced with a specialized radiofrequency (RF) coil and placed within a whole-body 4 T MRI system. Various phantom experiments characterized the interaction between the SPECT and MRI hardware components. The metallic components of the SPECT hardware altered the B(0) field and generated a non-uniform reduction in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the MR images. The presence of a magnetic field generated a position shift and resolution loss in the nuclear projection data. Various techniques were proposed to compensate for these adverse effects. Overall, our results demonstrate that accurate, simultaneous SPECT and MRI data acquisition is feasible, justifying the further development of MRSPECT for either small-animal imaging or whole-body human systems by using appropriate components.
    Physics in Medicine and Biology 02/2010; 55(6):1563-75. DOI:10.1088/0031-9155/55/6/002 · 2.92 Impact Factor