Article

The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study: a National Cancer Institute-supported resource for outcome and intervention research.

Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN 38105-2794, USA.
Journal of Clinical Oncology (Impact Factor: 17.88). 05/2009; 27(14):2308-18. DOI: 10.1200/JCO.2009.22.3339
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Survival for childhood cancer has increased dramatically over the last 40 years with 5-year survival rates now approaching 80%. For many diagnostic groups, rapid increases in survival began in the 1970s with the broader introduction of multimodality approaches, often including combination chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy. With this increase in rates of survivorship has come the recognition that survivors are at risk for adverse health and quality-of-life outcomes, with risk being influenced by host-, disease-, and treatment-related factors. In 1994, the US National Cancer Institute funded the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, a multi-institutional research initiative designed to establish a large and extensively characterized cohort of more than 14,000 5-year survivors of childhood and adolescent cancer diagnosed between 1970 and 1986. This ongoing study, which reflects the single most comprehensive body of information ever assembled on childhood and adolescent cancer survivors, provides a dynamic framework and resource to investigate current and future questions about childhood cancer survivors.

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