Article

Immunogenicity of the 10-valent pneumococcal non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV) compared to the licensed 7vCRM vaccine.

Vaccine Research Center, University of Tampere Medical School, Tampere, Finland.
The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal (Impact Factor: 3.14). 05/2009; 28(4 Suppl):S66-76. DOI: 10.1097/INF.0b013e318199f8ef
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The immunogenicity of the 10-valent pneumococcal nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae protein D-conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV) was assessed and compared with the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (7vCRM).
Healthy subjects (1650) were randomized to be vaccinated with 3 doses of PHiD-CV or 7vCRM (Prevenar/Prevnar) at 2-3-4 months of age and a fourth booster dose at 12-18 months. Serotype-specific pneumococcal responses (GlaxoSmithKline's ELISA with 22F-inhibition) and opsonophagocytic activity (OPA) were measured 1 month after primary and booster vaccinations.
The primary objective to demonstrate noninferiority of PHiD-CV versus 7vCRM (in terms of percentage of subjects with antibody concentration >or=0.2 microg/mL) for at least 7 of the 10 vaccine serotypes was reached as noninferiority was demonstrated for 8 serotypes. Although, noninferiority could not be demonstrated for ELISA responses against serotypes 6B and 23F, a post-hoc analysis of the percentage of subjects with OPA titers >or=8 suggested noninferiority for the 7 serotypes common to both vaccines including 6B and 23F.Priming of the immune system against all vaccine serotypes was confirmed by robust increases in ELISA antibody levels ( approximately 6.0-17 fold) and OPA titers ( approximately 8-93 fold) after a fourth consecutive dose of PHiD-CV.
PHiD-CV induces ELISA and functional OPA antibodies for all vaccine serotypes after primary vaccination and is noninferior to 7vCRM in terms of ELISA and/or OPA threshold responses. Effective priming is further indicated by robust booster responses.

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